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A Classics Research Guide: Citing Your Research

Resources to help Classics, Ancient Mediterranean Studies, and the study of the civilization and cultural achievements of ancient Greece and Rome

EndNote

End​Note is a program that makes it possible to collect and organize references in a database and instantly create properly formatted bibliographies.

Zotero

Zotero helps you collect, manage, and cite research sources. Zotero allows you to attach PDFs, notes and images to your citations, organize them into collections for different projects, and create bibliographies using Word or Open Office.

Style Guides

The Citing Your Sources research guide provides information on why you should cite your sources, plagiarism and how to avoid common mistakes, as well as a list of style manuals. A selected list of style manuals are listed below.

The Chicago Manual of Style Online
Also in print: 16th ed. Z253 .U69 2010 Reference Desk

MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 7th ed.
In print: LB2369 .G53 2009 Reference Desk
See the Purdue Online Writing Lab MLA Formatting and Style Guide for some online help.

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. 6th ed.
In print: BF76.7 .P83 2010 Reference Desk
See the Purdue Online Writing Lab APA Formatting and Style Guide for some online help.

Plagiarism

Using the work of another scholar without proper citation, whether that work is available in print or online, is plagiarism, a violation of the Emory Honor Code. It is extremely easy for professors to discover work plagiarized from web sources -- they know how to use Google at least as well as you do, and there are many online tools available specifically to help educators detect plagiarized work.