Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

LAW 747E - Law and Legal Professionals (Prof. Romig - Spring 2021): Scholarly vs. Popular Articles

Scholarly vs. Popular Periodicals

Questions for the MacMillan Law Library?

General Questions? 
Please complete this Questions for the Law Library? form.

Student Research Question?
Please complete our Student Research Request form. 

MacMillan Library Virtual Research Services (January 4, 2021 - May 14, 2021):
          Monday - Friday: 9am - 5pm

MacMillan Library Building Hours (January 19, 2021 - May 14, 2021):
          Monday - Thursday: 8am - 9pm
          Friday: 8am - 6:30pm
          Saturday: Closed
          Sunday: Noon - 6pm

Virtual Reference Desk (Zoom Meeting ID: 930-5184-4067) 
Monday - Thursday: 10am - 4pm
Friday: 10am - 2pm
Saturday - Sunday: Closed

IT Help Desk:
Monday - Friday: 10am - 5pm 
Saturday - Sunday: Closed

IT Virtual Help Desk

Email us at lawstudent-help@emory.edu and we'll reach out to you via Zoom.

"Scholarly" Articles v. "Popular" Articles

When researching your topic, you may come across many different types of sources and articles. When evaluating these sources, it is important to think about: 

  • Who is the author? 
  • Who is the audience or why was this written? 
  • Where was this published? 
  • Is this relevant to your research? 
  • When was this written? Has it been updated? 
  • Are there any citations? Who do they cite?
Scholarly  Popular
Written by experts, like academics, scientists, scholars, etc.  Written by generalists, such as journalists, bloggers, etc. 
Written for specialists or students in the field. 

Written for the general population

Written with scholarly or technical language.  Easy to read, or will define any specialized terms.
Will include a full bibliography of the sources that are cited.  No formal citations, or may not have any citations. 
Published in an academic journal. Published in a newspaper, magazine, or blog
Are often peer-reviewed Are edited in-house or self-edited.                                           

 

Helpful Links and Guides

Here are helpful links and guides to check out for more information on scholarly sources: 

  • This database contains data on different types of serials and can be used to determine whether a periodical is peer-reviewed or not: Ulrich's Periodicals Directory 
  • The UC Berkeley Library published this useful guide on evaluating resources, including the differences between scholarly and popular sources, as well as how to find primary sources: UC Berkeley's Evaluating Resources LibGuide