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MESAS370 Egypt: Politics, Society and Culture (Main)

discoverE

Use discoverE to find books, journals, videos, government documents, microfilm collections and other materials at the Emory libraries, including Woodruff; Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library; Goizueta Business; Pitts Theology; Woodruff Health Sciences Center; McMillan Law; Science Commons; Music and Media; and Oxford libraries.

Searching For Books In discoverE

From the Catalog tab in discoverE:

  • Type in your keywords
  • When you get some results, use "Refine Search Results" on the left to narrow your search by author, item type, date and more.

Too many search results?

  • Add additional terms to your search
  • Limit your search by item type, exact phrase, and/or author/title/subject using discoverE's drop-down menus
  • Use discoverE's "Refine Search Results" feature (in the left column) 

Too few results?

  • Remove some terms from your search
  • Add synonyms using OR [in upper case] with parentheses - for example (women OR woman OR female)

Off-topic results?

You can access your account to see what items you currently have checked out, when they are due, and to renew them. Click the "Sign in" button in the upper-right corner of discoverE to log in, or click here.

Requests and Recalls

If a book you're looking for is at Oxford College, at the Library Service Center, or checked out, don't fear!

Books that are at the Library Service Center or at Oxford can be requested, and checked out books can be recalled.

In discoverE:

  1. Click the item you'd like to request
  2. Click the "Locate/Request Item" tab
  3. Click the "Request" button [Note: you will need to be logged in to your account for this to appear]

You'll be notified by email when the item is available.

NOTE: if the item is checked out, the borrower has ten days to return it.

Primary Sources

A primary source is a document, recording or other source of information created at the time being studied, by an authoritative source, usually one with direct personal knowledge of the events being described.

Primary sources include diaries, letters, family records, statistics, speeches, interviews, autobiographies, film, government documents, or original scientific research.

You can find many primary source materials via discoverE. Primary sources can also be found in Rose Library.

For more detailed information, see the Primary Sources Research Guide.

Finding U.S. Government Documents

Start by searching discoverE, the library catalog

Also make sure to check the detailed guide on finding U.S. Government DocumentsIf you need assistance in searching, please don't hesitate to ask for help.

Microforms -- Information Resources in an Itty Bitty Format

Woodruff Library has millions of pages of newspapers, government documents, manuscript and archival records, and other primary source collections in microformat. Microforms are a storage medium containing materials that are photographed at a greatly reduced size for ease of storage and preservation.

The most common types of microforms are microfilm, which resembles a pint-size movie reel; and microfiche, which looks like a large plastic index card. Our microform collections are listed in discoverE. They can be viewed, printed and scanned using special equipment located on Level 2.

It takes practice to search for and use microforms effectively - so ask for help!

Searching For Articles In discoverE

In discoverE you can search some of our databases for articles.

When you first open discoverE, it defaults to using the Catalog tab. You should choose the Combined tab, which is the third from the left:

  1. Enter your search terms.
  2. Use discoverE's 'Refine Search Results' feature (in the left column) to limit your search to articles and by topic, author, and date.
  3. Click on the "Full Text Available' link if there is one. You should also click on the "No Full Text" links; some of them will lead to a full-text online copy.
  4. If it's not available online, follow these directions.

Using Databases to Find Articles

Databases like JSTOR and Academic Search Complete provide citations and/or full text of journal articles, books, and other materials. Emory University Libraries enable access to the contents of more than 400 databases. See our Databases page for a complete listing. For help with searching databases, see our Finding Articles at Woodruff research guide.

Access from off-campus is available only to current Emory University students, faculty and staff, and requires an Emory Network ID and password.

Sources to Find Academic Articles

  • Search one of the library's 400+ databases
  • Databases like JSTOR and Academic Search Complete provide citations and/or full text of journal articles, books, and other materials. Emory University Libraries pay for access to the contents of more than 400 databases. See our Databases page for a list of databases.
  • Search Google Scholar
    Google Scholar searches specifically for scholarly literature, including peer-reviewed papers, theses, books, preprints, abstracts and technical reports from all broad areas of research.

For more information, see Find Articles at Woodruff Library guide.

Search Libraries Worldwide

A catalog for libraries worldwide, WorldCat contains citations for books, journals, manuscripts, maps, music scores, sound recordings, films, computer files, newspapers, slides, and videotapes.

Materials from WorldCat may be requested through Interlibrary Loan.