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Native American and Indigenous Studies

Configuring Your Computer for Emory Resources

These steps will provide you with a basic configuration that will help you save time by adding menu shortcuts and using reference management software.

  1. Install the Emory browser plugin 
    • This is a plugin provides direct access to Emory library resources.
  2. Configure your Google Scholar settings to recognize Emory library resources.
    • Search for Emory on the "Library Links" page. Save your settings.
  3. Choose your reference management software. Many options are available, but the following three are the most commonly used at Emory.
  4. Check the list of upcoming workshops for relevant sessions.
    • Emory Libraries offers workshops in EndNote, Zotero, ArcGIS, research data management, copyright law, electronic thesis/dissertation submission, graduate test preparation, and other topics.

Having trouble connecting to the Emory wireless network?

Search Tips

  • Try different keywords and search terms using different databases and catalogs. Every database is different so some keywords and search terms work for one database but not for another.
  • Expand your search:
    • Include synonyms and plural/singular forms of keywords. Separate synonyms by OR. Separate the synonyms from the rest of the words by using parentheses.
    • Use truncation symbols (or wildcard symbols) to include variations of your search terms (e.g. scien$ will search for sciences, scientific, scientfically, etc.).
  • Narrow your search:
    • Combining different concepts/search terms with AND
    • Use the limit functions of the database. These are often located on the left side of the results page, or look in the database's Help menu to discover the limit functions it offers. Possibilities include limiting by date, language, type of article, etc.
  • Keep a record of which search terms worked and in which databases. This can keep you from repeating your steps.
  • Did you find an article you really like? Then, read the cited references (a.k.a. bibliography, end notes, footnotes) to find similar articles. This can bias your project by focusing on only one side of an issue so use caution with this method.
  • Ask for help. Ask a librarian for search tips. Also, use the help screens in the databases for instructions and tips.

Citing Your Sources

The Emory Libraries Citing Your Sources Research Guide provides information about why to cite sources, how to avoid plagiarism, how to avoid common mistakes, and a list of style manuals. Anthropologists frequently use the Chicago Style (also see the Quick Guide), the American Psychological Association Style (APA), or the American Journal of Physical Anthropology Style. Check with your instructor to find out which style you should use. 

You can also visit websites with basic guidelines on how to use common style formats. Some good websites include:

If you are using a citation manager (e.g. Endnote or Zotero), select the appropriate output style. The citation manager should automatically format your citations and bibliography, but don't forget to check it for accuracy.

Data citation is straightforward in many cases. The citation must include the title, author, date, version, and a persistent identifier (e.g. DOI, Uniform Resource Name, Handle System). Including the checksum or a Universal Numeric Fingerprint is also recommended (allows future researchers to verify data integrity). Refer to your style manual for guidelines on citation formatting.

For more information on data citation visit the ICPSR or DataCite pages.

Citation Software

Bibliographic management software can save a lot of time and frustration. Start organizing as soon as possible!

Zotero and Endnote are both excellent tools for organizing bibliographies and creating properly formatted citations. Zotero is freely available at their website and Emory has a site license for EndNote. You can obtain a copy by downloading the software from Emory's Software Express site (Emory network ID required). Mendeley, Papers, and Citavi are other popular software options.

Emory Writing Center

Emory's Writing Center provides thoughtful one-on-one attention and feedback at any stage of the writing process.

Sessions with tutors are available by appointment or during walk-in hours.

Video, Photo, and Audio Production

Student Digital Life studios support video, photo, and audio production, practicing and recording presentations, and online conferencing and streaming. See the Production Studio Overview and the links below: 

IRB at Emory

If you are conducting research that involves "human subjects" then your project might need to go through the IRB process. The Emory IRB website has several resources to help you complete and submit applications, including tutorials, instructional videos, webinars, help clinics, and more. Here are a few helpful pages for general information about requirements and the review process:

 

Copyright and Publishing Questions

If you have questions about whether you can use particular content or about your own content, contact the Scholarly Communications Office. They offer workshops on a variety of topics related to copyright and publishing, as well as research data management and data sharing. They also offer in-person consultations (schedule an appointment here) or email with your questions (scholcomm@listserv.cc.emory.edu). 

Also get to know Creative Commons and their copyright licensing tools.