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Teaching Information Literacy at Oxford

A guide for faculty on information literacy instruction offered by Oxford library.

Using Information Responsibly

Learning Outcomes 

  • Students will be able to describe the legal and socioeconomic influences on information production and dissemination in order to use information legally and ethically. 
    • Students will be able to explain the ethical violation inherent in using a work without credit or permission.

    • Students will be able to apply intellectual property laws to their use of an information source in order to use it legally. 

    • Students will be able to cite information sources (regardless of format, such as data and images) in order to give credit to the original ideas of others.

Learn more about library Student Learning Outcomes.

Example Activities

Grey Areas in Plagiarism 1

 

20 mins.

Break students into three groups and assign each group a "sticky situation" of plagiarism: a student borrows a friend's paper and copies sections about cited sources, a student's paper paraphrases another source and there is very little of their own writing in the paper, and a student plagiarized a paper in college and this is discovered years into their career. Ask students to discuss the severity of the cases and what they would do as various people in the situation. The College's Honor Code can be projected on the screen for student reference. Afterward, the class can discuss each group's opinions.

Recognizing Plagiarism

20 mins.

Show students examples of plagiarism and work appropriation: i.e. Fareed Zakaria's Time column and Shepard Fairey's HOPE poster of President Obama. Using Think-Pair-Share, ask students about why someone appropriates a work, what the real-world consequences are, and how the works could have been used ethically.

Using Creative Commons Material 2

35 mins.

Show students a short video about Creative Commons and discuss the advantages to using Creative Commons-licensed material. Highlight places to find Creative Commons images and other content. Invite students to independently find CC-licensed content for their project and ask them to explain their responsibility in accordance with the license of the item they chose.

Sources:

1. Avasthi, S. (2015). Gray areas in plagiarism cases. In P. Bravender, H. McClure, & G. Schaub (Eds.), Teaching information literacy threshold concepts: Lesson plans for librarians. (149-151). Chicago, Illinois: Association of College and Research Libraries.

2. Bliquez, R., & Van Galen, J. (2015). The who, what, and why of the Creative Commons. In P. Bravender, H. McClure, & G. Schaub (Eds.), Teaching information literacy threshold concepts: Lesson plans for librarians. (152-156). Chicago, Illinois: Association of College and Research Libraries.