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Anthropology

Use this guide to find books, articles, databases, and other resources for research in Anthropology.

Chicago Style

From the Chicago Manual of Style Quick Guide:

Chicago style source citations come in two varieties: (1) notes and bibliography and (2) author-date.

  • The notes and bibliography system is preferred by many working in the humanities—including literature, history, and the arts. In this system, sources are cited in numbered footnotes or endnotes.
  • The author-date system is more common in the sciences and social sciences. In this system, sources are briefly cited in the text, usually in parentheses, by author’s last name and year of publication.

If you know you need to use Chicago style but are unsure what variation to use, ask your professor, or talk with a librarian.

Chicago Manual of Style Online

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This resource, updated to reflect the Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.), offers examples of common citations in both style variations. Check here for help citing more resources or make an appointment with an Oxford librarian!

Icons are from the Noun Project and under Creative Commons licence (CCBY): books by sandra, article by Arfan Khan Kamol, website by Julynn B.

Books

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Some example citations are below, from the Chicago Manual of Style Online. As it is the more commonly used format, we have given examples here in the Notes and Bibliography variation. Please visit the Chicago Manual of Style's page on Author-Date for examples in that format!

How To Cite...

Note/Bibliography

1. Zadie Smith, Swing Time (New York: Penguin Press, 2016), 315–16.

Smith, Zadie. Swing Time. New York: Penguin Press, 2016.

Note/Bibliography

2. Brian Grazer and Charles Fishman, A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2015), 12.

Grazer, Brian, and Charles Fishman. A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2015.

Note/Bibliography

3. Henry David Thoreau, “Walking,” in The Making of the American Essay, ed. John D’Agata (Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2016), 177–78.

Thoreau, Henry David. “Walking.” In The Making of the American Essay, edited by John D’Agata, 167–95. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2016.

Articles

Article IconSome example citations are below, from the Chicago Manual of Style Online. As it is the more commonly used format, we have given examples here in the Notes and Bibliography variation. Please visit the Chicago Manual of Style's page on Author-Date for examples in that format!

From the Chicago Manual of Style Online:

If there are four or more authors, list up to ten in the bibliography; in a note, list only the first, followed by et al. (“and others”).

How To Cite...

 

Note/Bibliography

1. Farhad Manjoo, “Snap Makes a Bet on the Cultural Supremacy of the Camera,” New York Times, March 8, 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/technology/snap-makes-a-bet-on-the-cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html.

2. Rebecca Mead, “The Prophet of Dystopia,” New Yorker, April 17, 2017, 43.

Manjoo, Farhad. “Snap Makes a Bet on the Cultural Supremacy of the Camera.” New York Times, March 8, 2017. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/technology/snap-makes-a-bet-on-the-cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html.

Mead, Rebecca. “The Prophet of Dystopia.” New Yorker, April 17, 2017.

In Print - Note/Bibliography

1. Susan Satterfield, “Livy and the Pax Deum,” Classical Philology 111, no. 2 (April 2016): 170.

Satterfield, Susan. “Livy and the Pax Deum.” Classical Philology 111, no. 2 (April 2016): 165–76.

From an Online Database - Note/Bibliography

2. Shao-Hsun Keng, Chun-Hung Lin, and Peter F. Orazem, “Expanding College Access in Taiwan, 1978–2014: Effects on Graduate Quality and Income Inequality,” Journal of Human Capital 11, no. 1 (Spring 2017): 9–10, https://doi.org/10.1086/690235.

Keng, Shao-Hsun, Chun-Hung Lin, and Peter F. Orazem. “Expanding College Access in Taiwan, 1978–2014: Effects on Graduate Quality and Income Inequality.” Journal of Human Capital 11, no. 1 (Spring 2017): 1–34. https://doi.org/10.1086/690235.

Note/Bibliography

1. Michiko Kakutani, “Friendship Takes a Path That Diverges,” review of Swing Time, by Zadie Smith, New York Times, November 7, 2016.

Kakutani, Michiko. “Friendship Takes a Path That Diverges.” Review of Swing Time, by Zadie Smith. New York Times, November 7, 2016.

Websites

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Some example citations are below, from the Chicago Manual of Style Online. As it is the more commonly used format, we have given examples here in the Notes and Bibliography variation. Please visit the Chicago Manual of Style's page on Author-Date for examples in that format!

 

 

Please note that in Chicago Style, the URL of an online resource is always included.

How To Cite...

Note/Bibliography

1. “Mission and Vision - Oxford College Library - Emory University,” Oxford College Library, accessed July 25, 2019, https://oxford.library.emory.edu/about/About-Oxford/mission-vision.html.

Oxford College Library. “Mission and Vision - Oxford College Library - Emory University.” Accessed July 25, 2019. https://oxford.library.emory.edu/about/About-Oxford/mission-vision.html.

Note/ Bibliography

2. “Libraries = Strong Communities: Celebrating National Library Week,” Oxford College Library, accessed July 25, 2019, https://scholarblogs.emory.edu/oxford/events/libraries-strong-communities-celebrating-national-library-week/.

Oxford College Library. “Libraries = Strong Communities: Celebrating National Library Week.” Accessed July 25, 2019. https://scholarblogs.emory.edu/oxford/events/libraries-strong-communities-celebrating-national-library-week/.